5 Ways in Which Drug Rehab Makes Life Better

Making the decision to get help with addiction is a bold move, one that requires courage and strength. If you are newly sober, or if you are considering entering treatment for a substance abuse disorder, you may be feeling skeptical. How will sobriety compare to active addiction? What will you do with your time? Take a look at these 5 ways in which entering drug rehab will make your life infinitely better.

5 Ways in Which Drug Rehab Makes Life Better

  1. You can reconnect with your friends and family in a healthy way — One of the greatest gifts of recovery is the ability to successfully repair damaged relationships. While in the throes of addiction, you probably pushed those closest to you as far away as you possibly could. Those in active addiction will typically isolate because they don’t want to be criticized or “found out”. Sobriety allows for immense healing – not just personal healing, but the healing of interpersonal relationships. Remember that just because you’re sober, it doesn’t mean that everyone in your life has to automatically forgive you. Healing relationships won’t happen on your timeline – it will happen on the timeline of the people you love – and the people you hurt.
  2. You’ll discover who you actually are — When you’re a numbing reality with drugs and alcohol, it’s impossible to focus on self-growth or self-discovery. In your active addiction, nothing matters other than taking the next drink or chasing/experiencing the next high. When you get sober, you’ll find that you actually start to learn about yourself. You’ll discover your likes and dislikes, figure out some (healthy) hobbies, and learn what makes you tick.
  3. You’ll make new, lifelong friends — The friends that you make in recovery will be exponentially more reliable, fun, and compatible with you than the friends you made while using – and it makes sense, doesn’t it? You can probably easily convince yourself that your drug dealers, your using friends, and the people that enabled during your addiction had your best interest at heart. The truth is, the people that want to see you succeed, overcome your addiction, and maintain long-term recovery are the people that have your best interest at heart.
  4. You’ll develop a new set of personal values — the likelihood is that you completely lost touch with your personal values during your active addiction. You may have lied to protect yourself and your habits when you used to value honesty. You may have manipulated your loved ones when you used to value straightforwardness. You may have stolen money from your parents, or completely shunned your friends when they expressed concern. Not only will your personal values be re-installed, but you’ll develop new ones. The thorough level that you’ll get to know yourself on will lend itself to ongoing, personal development.
  5. You won’t wake up in the morning feeling anxious, or like everyone in the world hates you — waking up in the morning during active addiction is one of the most emotionally painful things a human being can experience. You feel as if everyone is mad at you – maybe you wake up not remembering the events that took place the night before. Maybe you wake up hungover, or in the midst of withdrawal. If you wake up hungover, withdrawing, or unable to immediately get what you “need” to feel “normal” again, anxiety will likely set in. There is absolutely nothing pleasant about the mornings when it comes to active addiction. Now imagine waking up at 7 am, feeling clear-headed and ready to go, making yourself breakfast, and drinking a cup of coffee on the patio as you enjoy the sunshine. Do the two compare?

The two lifestyles aren’t even close. It’s two totally different worlds. You’ll quickly reason that the answer is ‘no’ – active addiction does not compare to sobriety; not in the slightest. Still unsure? Do you have questions? Please feel free to reach out to our staff members with any questions or concerns you may have – we’re standing by to help you find a solution.