What Are the Side Effects of the Sublocade Shot?

Sublocade is a monthly buprenorphine injection, used for the treatment of opioid addiction. Those who are familiar with opioid abuse and dependency often know about the medication Suboxone, which is used to alleviate symptoms associated with opioid withdrawal and reduce psychological cravings. Suboxone is commonly used in an addiction treatment setting and used in conjunction with a comprehensive program of addiction recovery that includes intensive therapeutic care and 12 step immersion.

While Suboxone can be extremely beneficial to those in early recovery, it should never be used as a replacement for a long-term, comprehensive treatment plan. At Garden State Treatment Center, we believe in the clinical benefits of Medication-Assisted Treatment (MAT). However, we also believe that for addiction treatment to be successful long-term, each client must undergo intensive therapy and develop crucial coping mechanisms and relapse prevention skills.

Possible Sublocade Injection Side Effects

As far as Sublocade shots go, they are essentially injectable Suboxone shots that last for an entire month. Suboxone works by blocking opioid receptors in the brain, essentially fooling the central nervous system into believing that there are opioid narcotics present in the bloodstream. However, Suboxone – and Sublocade – do not produce any psychoactive effects. However, the shot does produce some side effects. It is important to note that while these side effects might be temporarily uncomfortable, they certainly beat the symptoms associated with active opioid addiction.

What Are the Side Effects of the Sublocade Shot?

What are the Side Effects of the Sublocade Shot?

The most common side effects associated with Sublocade include nausea, vomiting, constipation, dizziness, drowsiness, and headache. Some report red, itchy skin at the injection site, though this side effect will typically resolve rather quickly. As is the case with every medication, an allergic reaction is possible. If an individual experiences an allergic reaction it is a good idea that the medication is not used again. Fortunately, when it comes to MAT for opioid abuse, there are other options. At Garden State Treatment Center, we believe that Sublocade can be very effective in severe cases of addiction – but we also believe that anyone recovers from the throes of opioid addiction, whether or not they choose to utilize medication along the process.

How Are Sublocade and Vivitrol Different?

Sublocade and Vivitrol are similar in that they both prevent individuals who have been abusing opioids the opportunity to absorb addiction treatment without worrying about withdrawal symptoms of psychological cravings. However, Sublocade is for the treatment of opioid addiction exclusively, while Vivitrol can be utilized for the treatment of alcohol abuse and alcoholism as well. If an individual is not interested in taking a once-monthly shot, or if our medical team determines that this is not the most effective course of action, other medications can be prescribed. MAT will depend heavily on the individual, the severity of the addictive disorder, and which types of chemical substances were being actively abused. An in-depth and highly personalized evaluation will help us determine all these factors.

Garden State Treatment Center – Comprehensive Recovery 

At Garden State Treatment Center, we offer a highly individualized program of clinical care. Upon admission to our treatment program, everyone will undergo an evaluation, which will help our clinical team determine which treatment methods will be the most effective. If MAT is deemed necessary, our prescribing physicians might administer an effective medication like Sublocade.

As previously mentioned, MAT in and of itself is not enough to keep anyone sober long-term. The use of this medication must be coupled with intensive therapeutic intervention, and all underlying causes of addiction must be adequately addressed. If you or someone close to you has been suffering from a life-threatening opioid addiction and is interested in learning more about potential treatment options, give Garden State Treatment Center a call today.